BTFP SYLLABUS

SYLLABUS

Bachelor of  Television,Film and Photography (BTFP)

 

Bachelor of Social Science in Television,Film and Photography (BSS) is an eight-semester, 128-credit program. Students will complete 33 courses including a thesis or a production. The aim of this program is to provide students a broad-based education in television, film and media studies. It studies television and film as art forms, industries and means of mass communication. To fulfill this objective, it includes both theoretical and practical courses on television journalism, television production, filmmaking and film theory and criticism.

 

 

 

 

FIRST SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

Available Courses:

 

TFS 101: Introduction to Television and Film Studies (2cr)

 

TFS 102: Fundamentals of Communication and Journalism (2cr)

 

TFS 103: Bengali Language Skills for Audiovisual Media (4cr)

 

TFS 104: English Language Skills for Audiovisual Media (4cr)

 

TFS 105: Introduction to Photography (4cr)

 

 

 

SECOND SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

Available Courses:

 

TFS 106: Introduction to the Grammar of Audiovisual Media (4cr)

 

TFS 107: Television News Reporting and Anchoring (4cr)

 

TFS 108: Television News Editing (4cr)

 

TFS 109: Acting for Filmmakers (4cr)

THIRD SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

Available Courses:

 

TFS 201: Set Design and Lighting for Television and Film (4cr)

 

TFS 202: Sound and Music for Television and Film (4cr)

 

TFS 203: Working with Images (4cr)

 

TFS 204: Narrative Strategies and Screenwriting (4cr)

 

 

 

FOURTH SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

Available Courses:

 

TFS 205: Television Production: News and Current Affairs (4cr)

 

TFS 206: Television Journalism: Politics, Crime and Court (4cr)

TFS 207: Quantitative Research Method for Television and Film (4cr)

 

TFS 208: Introduction to Documentary (4cr)

 

 

 

FIFTH SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

Available Courses:

 

TFS 301: Television Production: Programs (4cr)

 

TFS 302: Television Journalism: Business and Economics (4cr)

TFS 303: Graphic Art and Animation (4cr)

 

TFS 304: Film and Video Editing (4cr)

 

 

 

SIXTH SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

Available Courses:

 

TFS 305: Television Journalism: Culture, Sports, and Entertainment (4cr)

 

TFS 306: Television and Film Direction (4cr)

  •  

TFS 307: Art and Aesthetics (4cr)

TFS 308: Qualitative Research Methods for Television and Film Studies (4cr)

 

 

 

SEVENTH SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

Available Courses:

 

TFS 401: Media Laws and Ethics (4cr)

 

TFS 402: Advertising as Social Communication (4cr)

  •  

TFS 403: Global Media: Issues and Problems (4cr)

 

TFS 404: Broadcast and Film Production Management (4cr)

Or

 

TFS 405: Digital Cultures (4cr)

 

TFS 406: Television Journalism: Health, Environment and Disaster (4cr)

EIGHTH SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

Available Courses:

 

 

TFS 405: Theoretical Approaches to Media Studies (4cr)

 

TFS 406: Television Journalism: Agriculture, NGOs and Development (4cr)

 

TFS 407: World Cinema (4cr)

 

TFS 408: Research Monograph (4cr)

 

Or

 

TFS 409: Graduate Production (4cr)

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRADING SCALE

 

Marks obtained (%)

Grades

Grade Point

80-100

A+

4.00

75-79

A

3.75

70-74

A-

3.50

65-69

B+

3.25

60-64

B

3.00

55-59

B-

2.75

50-54

C+

2.50

45-49

C

2.25

40-44

D

2.00

Less than 40

F

0.00

 

I

Incomplete

 

W

Withdrawn

 

 

[COURSE DESCRIPTION]

 

FIRST SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

 

TFS 101: Introduction to Television and Film Studies (2cr)

 

This course conceptualizes television and film as complex cultural and technological forms, industries, sites of textual production, and modes of entertainment. It also examines the nature of film and television audiences. It traces how the film production techniques, the film industry and broadcasting evolved over the years. It also explores different television and film genres.

 

Key readings:

 

Wasko, J. ed. (2005). A Companion to Television. MA, US: Blackwell

 

Kolker, R. (1999). Film Form and Culture. Boston: McGraw-Hill

 

Hill, J. and Pamela C. Gibson. ed. (1998). The Oxford Guide to Film Studies. Oxford: Oxford University Press

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

TFS 102: Fundamentals of Communication and Journalism (2cr)

 

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the key concepts of communication and journalism. The key ideas of communication which will be covered in this course include the types of communication such as interpersonal, small group and mass communication, the models of human communication, conflict resolution and communication skills and competence. The key concepts of journalism include objectivity, news treatment, newsroom operation, and freedom of expression, libel, defamation and privacy, right to information, accuracy and fairness.

 

Key readings:

 

Devito , Joseph A. (2003). Human Communication. USA : Pearson Education , Inc.

Barker , Larry L. ( 1981, Ed.2). Communication . Prentice –Hall

 

Pearson , C& Paul Nelson (2011). An Introduction to Human Communication . New York : McGraw -Hill

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 103: Bengali Language Skills for Audiovisual Media (4cr)

 

The aim of this course is to prepare students achieve the Bengali linguistic skills necessary for writing news and other scripts for television and film and for orally delivering news.

 

Key Readings:

 

P‡Ævcva¨vq, mybxZwZKzgvi (1996), fvlv-cÖKvk ev½vjv e¨vKiY, KjKvZv|

 

Bmjvg, iwdKzj (1992), fvlvZË¡, XvKv: wbDgv‡K©U

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 104: English Language Skills for Audiovisual Media (4cr)

 

The aim of this course is to prepare students achieve the English linguistic skills necessary for writing news and other scripts for television and film and oral delivery of news.

 

Key readings:

 

Murphy, Raymond (2004, 3rd ed.), English Grammar in USA, Cambridge University Press

 

Kangan, John (2011, 7th ed.), English Skills, McGraw Hill Publication

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 105: Introduction to Photography (4cr)

 

The aim of this course is to teach students about the fundamentals of photography and the evolution of photographic techniques over the years. After the completion of this course, the students will learn about the camera, techniques of composition, sharpness, focusing techniques, lighting techniques, and aesthetics of photography. Its primary goal is to prepare the students for understanding motion photography.

 

Key readings:

 

Hirsch, R. (2000). Seizing the Light: a History of Photography. USA: McGraw-Hill

 

Newhall, B. (1982). History of Photography.  New York: The Museum of Modern Art.

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

 

 

SECOND SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

TFS 106: Introduction to the Grammar of Audiovisual Media(4cr)

 

This course discusses the general conventions used by television and film to convey meanings through particular camera and editing techniques. The issues which will be covered in this course include camera and lens types, camera operating techniques, camera movement, types of shots, shot selection, cuts, graphics, light, sound, narrative styles, and aesthetics.

 

Key readings:

Bordwell, D. and Kristin Thompson (2012, Tenth Ed.). Film Art: An Introduction. USA: McGraw-Hill

 

Monaco, J. (2009, Fourth Ed.). How to Read a Film. USA: Oxford University Press

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

TFS 107: Television News Reporting and Anchoring (4cr)

 

This course will discuss different issues related to television news reporting. It will teach students to write TV news scripts and speak for a television audience, deliver live coverage, and conduct on-camera interviews. It will also teach students how to anchor a news show.

 

Key readings:

 

Boyd, A. (2000, Fifth Ed.). Broadcast Journalism. New York: Focal Press.

 

White, Ted (2013, Sixth Ed.). Broadcast News. New York: Focal Press.

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 108: Television News Editing(4cr)

 

This course teaches students how to edit reports, write headlines, translate reports, and arrange news run orders.

 

Key readings:

 

Boyd, A. (2000, Fifth Ed.). Broadcast Journalism. New York: Focal Press.

 

White, Ted (2013, Sixth Ed.). Broadcast News. New York: Focal Press.

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

 

TFS 109: Acting for Filmmakers(4cr)

 

This course aims to introduce students to the basic principles of the art and craft of acting. Students will become acquainted with acting processes, theatre terminologies, monologue, scene study, improvisation, and other fundamentals of acting. The goal is to develop a clear understanding of the job of an actor.

 

 

Key readings:

 

Oren Parker, W. (2015, 10th ed.), Scene Design and Stage Lighting, Cengage, UK

 

Preston, Ward (1994), What an Art Director Does, Silman-James, UK

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

 

 

                                                THIRD SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

TFS 201: Set Design and Lighting for Television and Film (4cr)

The course enables students to develop technical and creative skills in art direction and production design for the film and television industry. It incorporates theory and history of film and design, along with a practical approach to art direction. The design process starts with: breaking down scripts/text; developing initial concepts and visualizing; storyboarding; producing scale models, studio plans and set models (manually and computer-aided design). 

Under this course, students will also study lighting as a powerful tool of visual storytelling. They will learn lightning techniques to establish a scene or a character, to enhance the mood and feeling of the scene, to evoke emotion and to create depth, perspective and dimensions.

 

Key readings:

 

Millerson, G. (1999, Third Ed.). Lighting for Television and Film. New York: Focal Press.

Woodbridge, Patricia (2013), Designer Drafting for the Entertainment World, NYC: Focal Press

 

Rizzo, Michael (2005), The Art Direction Handbook for Film, NYC: Focal Press

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

TFS 202: Sound and Music for Television and Film (4cr)

 

This course will introduce students to concepts of music and sound for television and film. This class is a practical and theoretical exploration of the craft and aesthetics of sound. It will cover processing audio, cleaning up sound issues, and experimenting with sound, music, and silence.

 

Key readings:

 

Sonnenschein, D. (2002). Sound Design: The Expressive Power of Music, Voice and Sound Effects in Cinema. CA: Michael Wiese Productions.

 

Donnelly (2015), Making Music for Silent Films, Palgrave Macmillan

 

Wilson, Kulezic (2015), The Musicality of Narrative Film, Palgrave Macmillan

 

Mazierska (2015), Relocating Popular Music, Palgrave Macmillan

 

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 203: Working with Images (4cr)

The course emphasizes on visual storytelling through the eye of the camera. It gives hands-on practical training in film and digital cameras along with a rigorous input in the aesthetics of image making. Students will have a solid understanding on ways to create the right look for the given script. Lectures and practical sessions will extensively cover the conceptual tools of cinematography, shooting methods, language of the lens, exposure, set operation, camera angles, camera movements, and lighting basics. After the completion of this course, the students will be able to shoot professional quality videos in HD format.

Key readings:

Brown, B. (2012). Cinematography: Theory and Practice. New York: Focal Press

 

Malkiewicz, Kris and Mullen (2005, 3rd ed.), Cinematography: A Guide for Filmmakers and Film Teachers, New York: Simon & Schuster

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

TFS 204: Narrative Strategies and Screenwriting (4cr)

 

This class focuses on the various modes used in narrative and non-narrative storytelling in fiction films, drama and television. It will also introduce students to the primary forms of writing for the screen including features, shorts, drama and documentary. It will explore the basic theory and formal aspects of story, structure and character which are essential to all forms of screenwriting. The students will critically review produced scripts and films from a screenwriter's perspective.

 

Key Readings:

 

Marner, T. St. J. (1972). Directing Motion Pictures. London: The Tantivy Press

 

Howard, D. and Edward Mabley (1993). The Tools of Screenwriting. London: Souvenir Press.

 

Parker, P. (1999). The Art and Science of Screenwriting. Exeter, U.K.: Intellect.

 

Field, S. (2005). Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting. New York: Bentam Dell.

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

 

FOURTH SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

TFS 205: Television Production: News and Current Affairs (4cr)

This course combines theory and practice to develop television production skills. Students will have a solid understanding of the production process. They will achieve skills to guide shooting and editing programs across a range of television genres. Lectures and discussions will provide the opportunity to understand both the production process and the technology behind program making. Special focus will be on producing news and current affairs based programs. Topics will include electronic news gathering techniques, producing bulletins, live broadcast, documentaries, and shows based on current affairs such as talk shows. They will go through the details of program planning from casting to budget making, from research to scripting, and from team building to leading from the front.

Key Readings:

 

Zettl, H. (2005). Television Production Handbook. India: Cengage Learning

 

Gunter (2015), The Cognitive Impact of Television News: production Attributes and Information Reception, Palgrave Macmillan

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 206: Television Journalism: Politics, Crime and Court (4cr)

This course will equip students with the knowledge, skills and techniques required for television reporting on politics, crime and court. It will discuss political issues, processes and institutions, political parties, electoral system, forms of government, and the legal system of Bangladesh. Students will produce reports on politics, parliament, crime, and cases under trial.   

 

Key readings:

 

Jahan, Rounaq (1980, new expanded ed.) , Bangladesh Politics: Issues and Problems, University Press Ltd.

 

S.L. Alexander (2003, 2nd ed.), Covering the Courts: A Handbook for Journalists, Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield

 

Jon Bruschke (2005), Free Press vs. Fair Trials: Examining Publicity’s Role in Trial Outcomes, Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

 

TFS 207: Quantitative Research Method for Television and Film (4cr)

 

This course will discuss critical issues and methods of conducting quantitative research to understand media audiences. It will emphasize survey research so that students can conduct audience and public opinion surveys.

 

 

 

Key readings:

 

Paul, S, Maxim (1999), Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences, Oxford University Press

 

Islam, M.N. (2007), An Introduction to Research Methods, Dhaka: Book World

 

Neuman, W.L. (2000), Social Research Methods: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches, Boston: Allyn and Bacon

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 208: Introduction to Documentary (4cr)

 

This course will discuss the forms, strategies, structures and conventions of documentary film and video. Students will learn about the dominant and experimental modes of representation, important documentary movements and filmmakers, and a number of documentary genres. Students will gain knowledge of the current theoretical debates and dilemmas in documentary filmmaking such as the treatment of subjects and subject matter and construction and positioning of audiences.

 

Key Readings:

 

Nichols, B. (2010, Second Ed.). Introduction to Documentary. Indiana: Indiana University Press.

 

Plantinga, Carl L. (1997), Rhetoric and Representation in Nonfiction Films, Cambridge University Press

 

Nash (2014), New Documentary Ecologies: Emerging Platforms, Practices and Discourses, Palgrave Macmillan

 

Sharma, Aparna (2015), Documentary Films in India: Critical Aesthetics at Work, Palgrave Macmillan

 

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

                           

 

FIFTH SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

 

TFS 301: Television Production: Programs (4cr)

 

This course will take a more advanced and intensive approach to the production of specialized television shows in and outside the studio. Students will practically learn how to produce reality shows, docu-fictions, dramas, and other entertainment based programs. They will go through the details of program planning from casting to budget making, from research to scripting, from team building to leading from the front.

 

Key readings:

Zettl, H. (2005). Television Production Handbook. India: Cengage Learning

 

The instructor will also prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 302: Television Journalism: Business and Economics (4cr)

 

Students will be taught the skills of financial and business reporting for television. This course will discuss the building blocks of a national economy including banking and financial processes and institutions, trading system, national budget, and share market. Students will produce reports on financial institutions and share market.

 

Key readings:

 

Taparia, Jay (2004), Understanding Financial Statements: A Journalist’s Guide, Marion Street Press

 

Thompson, Terri (2001), Writing about Business: The New Columbia Knight-Bagehot Guide to Economics and Business Journalism, Columbia University Press

 

Roush, Chris (2010, 2nd ed.), Show Me the Money: Writing Business and Economics Stories for Mass Communication, Routledge

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

TFS 303: Graphic Art and Animation (4cr)

 

This course emphasizes visual storytelling through signs, typography, drawing, graphic design, illustration, color, and animations. Students will learn how to convey meanings and messages through visual forms. Components of this course will include: history of visual communications, communication and design processes, layout, and design concepts. The course is designed to introduce students to the world of motion graphics and special effects. It will also introduce students to the fundamental principles of character animation, tools to create object movement and animation, and how to use the tools to follow the basic conventions of animation. It will cover up to three-dimensional animation in film and digital media.

 

Key readings:

Ryan, W. and Theodore E. Conover (2003), Graphic Communications Today, India: Cengage Learning.

 

The instructor will also prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

TFS 304: Film and Video Editing (4cr)

 

This course explores technical, aesthetic, and practical consideration of editing film and video. It will concentrate on the development of editing styles that are appropriate to a vast range of narrative and non-narrative materials. Its main focus is on developing software skills for audio and video editing. Editing techniques will be taught using Final Cut Pro and AVID software.

 

Key readings:

 

Thompson, R. and Christopher Bowen (2009, Second Ed.). Grammar of the Edit. New York: Focal Press.

Murch, W. (1992). In the Blink of an Eye: A Perspective on Film Editing. NSW, Australia: Australian Film, Television & Radio School.

 

Reisz, K. and Gavin Millar. (2009, Second Ed.). The Technique of Film Editing. New York: Focal Press

Osder, J. and Robbie Carmen. (2007). Final Cut Pro Work Flows. New York: Focal Press

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

 

SIXTH SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

TFS 305: Television Journalism: Culture, Sports, and Entertainment (4cr)

This course will allow students to explore, expand and complicate their notions of what culture and learn techniques to visually represent them. Lectures will concentrate on a variety of cultural and entertainment topics: arts, music, books, theatre, film, food, fashion, lifestyle, festivals, and sports such as soccer and cricket. Students will understand sports and entertainment as art forms, entertainment tools and business.

 

Key readings:

 

Norm Goldstein & et al (latest edition), Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual 

 

Michael Lewis, Michael & Stout, Glenn (2008), The Best American Sports Writing 2008

 

Saenger, Diana (2002), Everybody Wants My Job!: The ABC’s of Entertainment Writing, Colorado Springs, Colo. : Piccadilly Books

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 306: Television and Film Direction (4cr)

This course will explore in detail the role of the film director. It will introduce students to the business of filmmaking. Students will learn the directing techniques for working with a moving camera, developing character, exploring subtext, scene studying and analyzing, breaking down a script to prepare for filming, location scouting and learn how a director works collaboratively with actors and producers to achieve his/her vision in storytelling working.

 

Key Readings:

Marner, John (1976), Directing Motion Pictures, St. John Marner, USA

  •  

Katz, Steven, D. (1991), Film Directing: Shot by Shot, Michael Wiese Productions, USA

 

Profres, Nicholas (2008), Film Directing Fundamentals, Focal Press, U.K

 

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

 

  •  

TFS 307: Art and Aesthetics (4cr)

Art Appreciation introduces the student to the importance of art in today’s world and the purposes it has served from prehistoric through modern times in a variety of cultures both Western and non-Western. Placing art in context with family, politics, religion, sexuality, social protest and entertainment enables students to gain an insight into the significance of creativity in its many physical manifestations. By providing measurable standards for understanding artistic intent and expression through the basic elements of art and aesthetics, students may increase their appreciation of the role of the arts in media studies.

 

Key Readings:

Gaut, Berys and Lopes, Dominic Mclver (2013), Routledge Companion to Aesthetics, Routledge

 

Stott, Douglas W (1998), The Philosophy of Art, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

 

TFS 308: Qualitative Research Methods for Television and Film Studies (4cr)

 

This course discusses critical issues and methods of conducting qualitative research on television and film. Qualitative methods explored in this course include in-depth interviews, ethnography, semiotics, textual analysis, discourse analysis, critical discourse analysis, ideological analysis, and content analysis.

Topics to be covered: Research design, text and image, data analysis, and report writing

 

Key readings:

 

Berger, Arthur A. (2000), Media and Communication Research Method, London: Sage

 

Marshall, Catherine and Gretchen B Rossman (1999, 3rd ediiton), Designing Qualitative Research, London: Sage

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

 

SEVENTH SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

 

TFS 401: Media Laws and Ethics (4cr)

 

This course will introduce students to the study of legal and ethical issues in the media. Students will develop an understanding of these issues and the ability to analyze the important legal and ethical issues involved with the mass media industry.

 

Key readings:

Moore, R. L. and Michael D. Murray (2012, Fourth Ed.). Media Law and Ethics. London: Routledge.

 

Mathewson, Joe (2013), Laws and Ethics for Today’s Journalists, M.E. Sharpe Inc.

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

TFS 402: Advertising as Social Communication (4cr)

The course will explore the thriving advertising industry of Bangladesh in global context, examining advertising as a form of communication. Lectures and discussions will examine the history and development of advertising, ethical,

regulatory and social issues related to advertising; and the nature and impact of advertising. The key objective of the course is to provide an understanding of advertising’s role in the emergence and perpetuation of consumer culture. Students will examine the strategies historically employed to promote the circulation of goods as well as the impact of advertising on the creation of new habits and expectations in everyday life.

 

Key readings:

 

Wells, William D. & et.al. (2006, 7th ed.), Advertising: Principles and Practices, India: Pearson

 

Leiss, W. Steve Kline, and Sut Jhally (2005). Social Communication in Advertising. New York: Routledge.

The instructor may also prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

  •  

 

TFS 403: Global Media: Issues and Problems (4cr)

 

In recent years, the globalization of the media has become a key issue of debate and discussion in many nations. Lectures and discussions will shed light on the complex and contradictory relationships among global, national and local forces that shape the globalization of the media. This course will explore the global media structure and institutions and critically examine the role that film, television, video games, and other media play in shaping our sense of global, national, and local cultures and identities.

 

Key readings:

 

Flew (2015), Global Media and National Policies: The Return of State, Palgrave Macmillan

 

McChesney, Robert (2004), Global Media: The New Missionaries of Global Capitalism, London: Library of Congress

 

Mattelart, Armand (2010), The Globalization of Surveillance, London: Polity Press

 

Mattelart, Armand (2003), The Information Society: An Introduction, Sage Publication

 

Thussu, Daya (2010), International Communication: A Reader, Routledge

 

Sukosd, Miklos (2015), Media Pluralism and Diversity: Concepts, Risks and Global Trends, Palgrave Macmillan

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 404: Broadcast and Film Production Management (4cr)

 

The course provides an overview of television and film industry structure, management and marketing system. It will discuss management theories, functions and work-flow of cinema industries, unique characteristics of media outlets, their goals, missions, decision making, leadership style, marketing policies and market analysis, product planning, promotion, human resource development and financial management for media and film industries. It concentrates on developing skills for running a television station and handling the production of a film.

 

Key readings:

 

Thomas, J. P. (2009). Media Management Manual. New Delhi: Unesco.

 

Quaal, W. L. (1976). Broadcast Management: Radio, Television. Florida: Hastings House

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

Or

 

TFS 405: Digital Cultures (4cr)

 

These days the Internet dramatically shapes everyday life, culture, politics, business and communities. This course will critically examine the emergence and significance of digital cultures. It will discuss the technological, financial, cultural and political aspects of the digital information revolution and Internet based media and communications. The course will deal with topics such as technological convergence, digital divide, e-commerce, e-governance, online communities, blogs, videogame cultures, virtual realities, cyborg identities, and online activism. It will interrogate the politics of race, class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, nationalism, capital, and technology shaping the practices of Internet communication.

Key Readings:

 

Castells, M. (1996). The Rise of the Network Society. Oxford: Blackwell

 

Castells, M. (1997). The Power of Identity. Oxford: Blackwell

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 406: Television Journalism: Health, Environment and Disaster (4cr)

 

This course will acquaint students with all the domains of health, environment and disaster and teach them how to write compelling narratives for television on these issues.  It will also make students familiar with the relationship between media, health, environment, and disaster. Students will produce stories on health and environmental issues and disaster.

 

Key readings:

 

Gordon Guyatt et al. (1999), A Journalist’s Guide to Writing Health Stories, American Medical Writers Association Journal

 

Nelson, P. (1995), Ten practical tips for environmental reporting, Reston VA: Center for Foreign Journalists

 

Carolyn Ross (1995), Writing Nature; An ecological reader for writers, St.Martin’s Press, Inc.

 

Blum, D. & Knudsdon, M. (2005), A field guide for science writers, New York: Oxford University Press.

 

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

 

EIGHTH SEMESTER

TOTAL CREDITS: 16

TOTAL MARKS: 400

 

 

TFS 405: Theoretical Approaches to Media Studies (4cr)

 

This course discusses the theoretical approaches to understand the media. The approaches include critical theory, political economy, cultural studies, structuralism, feminist theory, and post-structuralism/post-modernism, and post colonialism.

 

Key readings:

 

Wasko, J (2005),A Companion to Television, USA, Blackwell

 

Marris, P. & Thornham, S (2000), Media Studies: A Reader, New York: New York

 

Mosco, V. (2008), Political Economy of Communication, Sage: New York

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 406: Television Journalism: Agriculture, NGOs and Development (4cr)

 

This course discusses the agriculture and development sectors of Bangladesh. It introduces students to development debates and issues and prepares them to write stories on these issues. Students will produce reports on agricultural and development issues for television.

 

Key readings:

 

Ward, William Binnington (1959), Reporting Agriculture Through Newspapers, Magazines, Radio, Television, Comstock Pub. Associates

 

Hossain, Mosharaff (1991), Agriculture in Bangladesh: Performance, Problems, and Prospects, University Press

Ullah, A.K.M.Ahsan & Routray, Jayant K. (2003), NGOs and Development, Alleviating Rural Poverty in Bangladesh, Book Mark International Ltd.

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

TFS 407: World Cinema (4cr)

 

This course will introduce the cinemas of Bangladesh, India, Japan, Iran, South Korea, the U.S., and Latin America. It will discuss these cinemas by comparing their forms, contents, aesthetics and narrative styles and practices, by keeping their socio-cultural contexts in mind. 

 

Key readings:

 

Bradley, L. et al. (2005). Traditions in World Cinema. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press

Nowell-Smith, G. (1999). The Oxford History of World Cinema. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

Hill, J. and Pamela C. Gibson. (ed.) (1998). The Oxford Guide to Film Studies. Oxford: Oxford University Press

The instructor will prepare a custom courseware incorporating necessary readings and exercises.

 

 

TFS 408: Research Monograph (4cr)

 

The students will write a 15-20,000 word thesis on any area of media studies.

 

Key readings:

 

The student and supervisor will prepare a reading list necessary for writing the monograph.

 

Or

 

TFS 409: Graduate Production (4cr)

 

Students will produce a 5-7 minute fiction film or a 20-25 minute documentary.

 

Key readings:

The student and supervisor will prepare a reading list necessary for helping the production.

 

 

Course requirements:

Regular weekly meeting with the supervisor: 5%

Proposal presentation: 10%

Thesis: 75%

Oral: 10